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New Home Questions & Answers
For more information on new home mold, please visit:
New Home Mold, plus these web pages below---

[Up] [More Photos] [New Home Q and A] [New-Home-Mold-News] [Home-Construction-Defects] [Colorado-Builder-Mold-Lawsuit] [Builder-Mold-Exclusion-Clauses] [House-Wrap] [Protect-Plywood] [OSB-Mold] [Pulte-Homes-Mold]

    
Q. July 1, 2012 I am currently in the process of building a new house and after doing a walk through with the builder, I noticed some mold growing on the trusses (as per attached photos).  Any advice on how I should approach this with the builder? Editor's Note: The pictures are at the bottom of this webpage.
     
A. You are right to worry about the substantial mold growth on the timbers of your new house under construction.  If this problem is not fixed properly, you will own a house with several mold infestation inside ceilings, walls, floors, and the heating/cooling system, causing substantial health harm to your family and reducing your home value big time. All visible mold must be removed with a wire brush attachment to a power grinder to clean, mold-free timber. If a particular timber cannot be made mold free visually, it needs to be replaced. In addition, all timbers (after the mold removal above) need to be sprayed heavily with two coatings (drying in between) of Tim-Bor, an EPA registered fungicide and insecticide that protects the timbers AND all plywood against mold growth and termite.  Please visit my website at http://www.moldnspector.com/new_home_mold.htm.  Also visit http://www.buildingmoldinspection.com and http://www.moldexpertconsultants.com. Please email me any followup q's you may have. Best wishes, Phillip Fry, mold expert. Certified Environmental Hygienist, Certified Mold Inspector, and Certified Mold Remediator
 

         Q. We are builders and have houses with odors which we want to rid. Please send us information on ridding houses of odors. [June 1, 2005]
         A.
To get rid of mold stains and mold odors, use Borax laundry detergent, a natural mold cleaner, in warm water.  If your homes have a mold problem, you should also consider searching for and fixing all moisture and water problems that enable mold to grow in the first place. Using the Stain Cleaner is most effective in mold remediation if you follow the 25 steps for safe and effective mold remediation Learn the mold problems of new homes at New Home Mold.

        Q. Wow, thank you so much for such a quick and detailed reply. I have carefully studied what you have written here including most of the tips section too.  I will bring this up at the meeting this morning. This gives me the motivation to get your recommendations done as soon as possible - our builder warrantee runs out on May 27 and maybe I can even get them to be interested in helping do what they should have done in the first place, due to their negligence damaging a child's health.  But even without them I will get this done immediately - we do have a contact person we got from a neighbor who had some remediation done including the plastic barrier.  When we had an initial indoor ground water crawl space flood in 1998 or so I went down and removed all the scrap wood and trash and dug and plumbed my own sump pit and pump because the French drains the builder put in did not work at all – their corner sump pit was dry while 50-75% of the area in the lower spots was flooded.  We were so disgusted with them at the time that my wife did not even want them in the house to do a poor job of redoing things so we did not even call them, which I regret. I have been down there recently and verified the white-dust-looking mold is localized to about 10 square feet of cumulative coverage on the floor joists but it is near the access hole, with the hatch having been left open for a long time. I sprayed all the mold I could see with Clorox a few months ago and I often check on the ground, which does grow fluffy calcium crystals.  I usually don't notice a smell when I am in the unfinished area.  Thank you again for your kindly given time.  You have helped me to get motivated to get remediation under way immediately even if the doctor doesn't think it caused the positive results to my young son's TB test! I can imagine it has at least contributed to his two sinus infections this winter and spring. [May 13, 2005]
         A. You need to send a certified letter now via certified letter to the builder, with the letter containing very specific claims as to construction defects. You might be wise to consult with a local attorney as to your legal rights under the builder's warranty program and otherwise under state law. As you know now, your use of bleach would have been ineffective in permanently killing mold growth.  Having a crawl space is an invitation to mold disaster. You should consider covering the ground with concrete containing adequate amounts of waterproofing compound to make the concrete a very effective  moisture barrier against water wicking up from the ground. Is there a way for you to construct concrete/block walls [with plenty of waterproofing compound] to keep the surface water from EVER entering your crawl space? You also need to not only kill the mold growing in the floor joists, but also to remove the growth in accordance with the 25 steps for safe and effective mold remediation.  Crawl space mold can easily grow into the floors and walls above. In addition, crawl space mold can travel in air currents to mold cross contaminate your entire house and its heating/cooling system by entering open windows and doors and the fresh air intake of your heating/cooling system. You would be wise to mold inspect and mold test your ENTIRE home. Follow the directions at Mold Inspection.


         Q.
Prior to signing the contract on the purchase of a new [name of builder] home I was presented with the following "Disclosure".  "The framing package delivered to this home site was found to contain active mold. The mold was pervasive but limited to the second floor frame materials. Production was halted, the contaminated surfaces were washed and sanitized, and moisture levels were monitored until they reached [name of builder]  maximum standards of 15% or less, at which time construction resumed." Should this be of concern to me? Does the home warrant an inspection by a mold expert? [Jan. 19, 2005]
        
A. Most mold remediation is done poorly because of ineffective mold remediation procedures, poor worker training, and job shortcuts taken by contractors and their employees. You don’t know how “the contaminated surfaces wee washed and sanitized.” Usually washing and sanitizing are not enough to get mold out of moldy timbers and building materials. Learn the 25 steps for safe and effective mold remediation. To know whether the new home is mold-safe for you to live in, you would need to hire your own Certified Mold Inspector for in-depth mold inspection and testing, including fiber optics inspection for hidden mold growth inside ceilings, walls, floors, and the heating/cooling equipment and ducts. Even if you can find and remediate all mold growth in this new home, you would still own a home with a mold history which you would probably have to disclose to a future buyer or tenant. Learn about new home mold problems. You need also to consult with your attorney about the legal consequences to you of the mold disclosure if your home and family suffer future mold damage because of the allegedly-remediated mold problem. 

        Q. I recently bought a brand new house and discovered a water leak while we were moving in. We noticed standing water in our downstairs bathroom and water dripping from the ceiling. We discovered a wet carpet and water stains on the baseboards upstairs. Of course we shut off the water main and called our builder representative and they started their standard operating procedure for water intrusion. In that process they discovered mold. We wont know what type until the results come back from the hygienist. They said that a staple had penetrated a pipe when the stucco was installed. How long do you think it would take for mold to form behind a vanity kick plate in a house that's average temperature is about 70 degrees? [December 15, 2004]
        
A. Mold can begin growing after the building materials have been wet for more than 24 hours. A water line leak is really good news for mold to grow a lot in a short time period. Your first mistake would be to rely upon the mold inspection and testing services and recommendations of a mold inspector hired by and loyal to the builder, rather than to you. You need to hire a Certified Mold Inspector to thoroughly mold inspect and mold test ALL AROUND your home for elevated levels of airborne mold spores and mold growth. The Inspector will need to check INSIDE walls and floors and ceilings in the water leak area, and do testing in the basement, crawl space, each room, attic, garage, and the outward air flow from each heating/cooling duct register for the possible presence of elevated levels of airborne mold spores, in comparison to an outdoor mold control test. Most builders try to get away with the least they can do. Learn the 25 steps recommended for safe and effective mold remediation. Also read about new home mold.

        
Q.  I plan to build a new home in Yellow Springs Ohio. We want to take all the reasonable steps to provide good air quality. We have key concerns regarding the ductwork. What specific recommendations do you have to reduce the possibility of mold growth in a new home in the duct system and basement? [Nov. 30, 2004]
          A. To prevent mold growth in the duct work and heating/cooling equipment, consider such steps as using sheet metal ducts [with no INTERNAL insulation to trap dirt and mold spores and to foster mold growth]. The insulation of the ducts should be on the outside of the ducts, isolated from the air flow of the ducts themselves. Sheet metal ducts can be cleaned of mold growth if necessary, whereas internally-insulated ducts and ducts made of other materials become throw-aways during mold remediation efforts. Install several high output ultraviolet lights inside the system to kill airborne bacteria, viruses, and mold spores. In the return air duct, it would be extremely useful to have a mass media hepa filter, changeable hepa filter to capture incoming mold spores. Mass media means about a 6 inches thick or thicker hepa filter, and it requires special ductwork housing of course. You order the mass media hepa filter to be installed with the system from the beginning. Follow manufacturer's guidelines for the cleaning and replacement cycles for the hepa filter itself [which goes inside a housing unit in the return air duct].

         Q. We are currently building a home with XYZ Homes Inc.  I have heard conflicting advice about sealing concrete block prior to applying stucco.  Some have said that you should do it to prevent water intrusion and XYZ Homes says not to do it because it will not allow the concrete block to "breath" thus trapping moisture  between it and the drywall.  What is your advice? [Nov. 26, 2004]
         A. Use an effective waterproofing sealant on the outside of the concrete block is very advisable to help keep water out of your home. You should also only install drywall in the finished home when you have done mold pre-treatment of interior block surface, wood timbers used, and drywall [both sides]. Use a hidden moisture meter to determine if the masonry wall is dry enough to do interior finishing. You can use also a low-cost Mold Home Remedy Recipes available  at Mold Mart . Make sure there is adequate ventilation in the basement and that the indoor basement humidity stays less than 60% including prior to your move in. You may need to use a programmable dehumidifier to keep indoor humidity to a mold-discouraging level [the best is 30 to 40%]. Read about new home mold.

          Q.
My wife and I are building a new home.  Wet weather has been a problem since we began framing.  We have noticed black spots on the wood where it has been wet in many areas. Is this back mold ?  What can we do to remove
it?  We are very concerned about this!!! [Nov. 20, 2004]

           A. If you want to protect both your health and wealth, don't build a new home full of mold contamination. Learn about new home mold at New Home Mold The black spots are mold. Either replace moldy timbers with mold-free timbers or remove all mold growth, streaks, and spots with a combination of a power planer, power grinder with wire brush attachment, and power sander. You can use also a low-cost Mold Home Remedy Recipes available  at Mold Mart . Learn the 25 steps recommended for safe and effective mold remediation and mold abatement. 

         Q. We purchased a brand new house on October 1st. Upon reviewing the house for the 30 day checklist, we have found mold hanging from the studs in the basement.  Do you think there could be mold in the main levels of the house?  How should we proceed with the builder? [Nov. 24, 2004]
        
A. Learn about new home mold Basement mold can easily grow into the insides of the floors and walls above. In addition, airborne mold spores from the basement mold can easily travel in air currents to mold cross contaminate your entire house and heating/cooling system. Learn the 25 recommended steps for effective and safe mold remediation and mold abatement. You need to hire a Certified Mold Inspector to do a thorough mold inspection and testing of the home, including using fiber optics inspection inside floors and walls above the basement mold.

         Q. My husband and I moved from Illinois in August 2003 to Indiana where we build a new house and moved in November 2003.  Since moving in to our new house, I have been having problems with my sinuses.  I have had seven infections since moving and medicine does not seem to be doing much.  My 4 year old started having sinus infections to the point that he would vomit because his head hurt so bad.  He has since had his tonsils and adenoids taken out and has still had some problems.  I finally went to an ENT to see what he had to say.  I was sent home with some petri dishes to set out in my home to see how many spores I would get in one.   The main level of our house was not too bad, however the master bedroom had between 50 and 60 spores, with a greenish center.  I was told by the doctors office that we basically have a mold issue.  I did contact the builder and they sent someone out and they went into the attic and said that they did not find any moisture, mold growing and that the vents from the bathrooms were venting properly.  The doctors office also said that the mold issues that they have been seeing from other patients are not very visible to the naked eye - that a professional has been coming to these people homes to see what is going on.  I don't know if we are just overly sensitive to the airborne mold in our home or if we do have some sort of an issue that needs to be addressed.  I was just wondering if you could give me some input on the truth to what the doctor is saying or if I should just get some air purifiers and forget about the mold. [Oct. 21, 2004]
       
A. A study by the famous Mayo Clinic discovered that over 90% of the patients with chronic sinusitis got it from living in mold infestation. Your family's repeated sinus problems tells you that you are living in a severely mold-contaminate home. Your doctor is obviously well-informed. His advice to you about the health damage caused by invisible airborne mold spores is truly wise on the doctor's part. If you have a mold contamination problem in just one area of your home, it can spread by internal growth hidden inside walls, ceilings, floors, attic, basement/crawl space, and the heating/cooling equipment and ducts. In addition, air current movements can transport airborne mold spores to mold cross contaminate your entire house and its heating/cooling system. You would be wise to read our in depth book Mold Health Guide, available at Mold Mart  Your first step for getting rid of mold is to use our do it yourself mold test kits to mold test ALL of your entire home for mold infestation both before and after mold remediation efforts. This total home mold testing is especially helpful since your initial mold testing revealed a serious mold problem. Alternatively, have your home professionally inspected and mold tested by a Certified Mold Inspector. Most mold removal efforts fail because of the failure to follow the mold abatement  procedures required for safe and effective mold remediation. Test the air of any attic/basement/crawl space, garage, each room, and the outward air flow from each heating/cooling duct register for the possible presence of elevated levels of airborne mold spores, in comparison to your outdoor mold control test. Use do it yourself mold test kits available from a large hardware, home improvement, or safety store. You should also collect samples of any visible mold for mold lab analysis and mold lab mold species identification by using the Scotch tape lift sampling technique explained on the mold test kit instructions provided by do it yourself mold test kit.. Collect a different mold sample from each different mold growth location.

Mold Problems from a number of Construction Defects
          Q. I just bought a new house we close on 8/6/04. How can I keep my home mold-free. What preventive measures can We take. Where does mold usually show up in a new home? Am I covered for mold in my home owner’s insurance? [August 6, 2004]
         
A.
Mold problems will first show up in a new home in the testing of indoor air for elevated levels of airborne mold spores. Most insurance policies exclude mold damage. If possible, delay the closing on the house until you have had the opportunity to have the home mold inspected and mold tested by a Certified Mold Inspector. Even though the house is new, it is very possible, and even very likely, that the home has built-in mold problems from a number of construction defects and procedures utilized by the home builder. Read all about new home mold problems, plus mold remediation tips.  While a home is still under construction [at the framing stage], all timbers, plywood, and drywall need to be sprayed with at least one coating of a strong fungicide on all surfaces, followed [after drying] by one wet spraying of an EPA-registered wood protectant. Visit: Mold Mart for product information Assuming that the new home is actually mold-safe, your next step is to make sure that the landscaping of the grounds facilitates water running away from the house, and not toward the house [causing possible water intrusion]. Regularly check your roof and siding for damage that could allow water entry into your home. Monitor your indoor plumbing lines and sewage lines against hidden water leaks inside walls, floors, and ceilings with a hidden moisture meter. Another preventive step is use a $30 digital hygrometer to monitor year-round the indoor humidity of your basement, crawl space, each room, attic, and garage. Your goal is to keep the indoor humidity at a mold-discouraging 30 to 40 percent. If the indoor humidity exceeds 60 percent, you have invited mold to be a permanent guest in your home. Learn many more mold preventive steps in the ebook Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Prevention, Inspection, Testing, and Remediation, available from Mold Mart.

        Q. We are in the process of designing and building a new home. What precautions should we take to prevent future mold infestation in our home?  [June 3, 2004]
        A.. To prevent mold growth in new home construction, all wood, plywood, chipboard, drywall, and other cellulose-based construction materials must never be stored on the ground during construction, or be left uncovered outdoors [to keep the materials dry if it rains]. To provide a defense against mold growth, until the house is completely shingled and sided and windows and doors installed, the house-under-construction should be covered completely at the end of every work day to keep the home from being rained on. Beneath your roof shingles should be a high-quality roofing membrane to waterproof your proof. Covering every night is time-consuming, but it is far better than owning a mold-infested home which will harm both your health and your finances. Inspect all timbers and building materials for visual evidence of mold growth [e.g., black or dark blue or green stains on timbers].
You can use also a low-cost Mold Home Remedy Recipes available  at Mold Mart . Make sure your plumbing water supply, drain, and sewer pipes and plumbing fixtures are of the highest quality and installed by a master plumber, and not by some untrained illegal immigrants [a huge quality control problem in the home building industry]. Be sure your concrete floor slab, garage concrete floor, and basement floors and walls are built with sufficient amounts of waterproofing compound mixed into the concrete to make the concrete absolutely impervious to water penetration. Install a high quality water proof barrier [not just plastic sheeting] beneath concrete floors as an additional water barrier to keep water from rising out of the ground to wet the concrete and therefore the wood walls resting on the concrete floors. When you first have water running in your plumbing system, use a hidden moisture meter to scan all floors, walls, and ceilings for hidden water leaks. Make sure your heating/cooling ducts are made of sheet metal with any insulation being on the outside of the ducts, not inside the ducts. Sheet metal ducts without insulation inside can be cleaned of mold contamination if ever necessary in the future. Make sure all dryer, kitchen, and bathroom vents go by well-connected pipe directly outdoors and not in the attic, crawl space, or walls or ceiling. Install high-capacity ultraviolet lights [388,000 uwats per second of exposure to air movement] in the return air ducts of your heating/cooling system to kill all airborne mold spores and other biological airborne threats.. Install a "mass media", very thick hepa filter in the return air duct to filter out airborne mold spores and other pollutants.

         Q.
We are building a new home. The building project started around February and the wood has been exposed to rain from that time although early in the year we had little rain.   The house has been framed for at least 2 months or more but the roof is not completed yet. Over the past month we have had a lot of rain which has caused the interior wood to get wet numerous times.  We have had some spots of mold growth appear, some I would classify as severe and other spots less severe.  Some of these can be remedied by removing and replacing the sub floor material.  There are spots however where the material cannot be removed and replaced for various reasons [plywood that is under a load bearing roof  line or under heat & air units for example].  Before we continue I am looking for advice on what can be done to minimize and mold problems in the future related to this.  I am chemically sensitive and have had sensitivities to molds as well.  The builder is willing to [because I have expressed concern] remove any sub flooring that can be removed that has visable signs of mold and then spray what cannot be removed [only where mold is visable].  I have only addressed with him the areas where mold is visible which at this point is only on subfloor material.  Most of the wood throughout the house has gotten extremely wet [soaked] numerous times.  The builder does not understand the potential problems that mold can cause as he feels that killing the visible mold will remedy the situation.  I feel certain that our extremely expensive new home is now be set up to have mold problems - possibly extensive problems.  My husband says that this is common when building a new home. The wood on all new homes gets wet regularly until the roof is on and that it causes no problems.We live in Alabama and I feel sure that I will need to get an expert to look at the situation and provide recommendations.  After reading some of the information on your site I wonder if the house will need to be demolished. Any information or help you could provide would be very appreciated. As a side note I have spent a great deal of extra money on the house trying to create a healthy indoor environment due to my chemical sensitivities.  It is very disheartening to think that our new home will not be healthy. [June 4, 2004]

        A. Your home will have a massive mold infestation problem. Of course, many new homes get rained on during construction, and they get mold-infected in the process. Read New Home Mold You will need to mold test the surfaces of all of the timbers and plywoods for mold infestation that is not yet apparent. You will need to either replace moldy timbers and lumber, or remove the surface mold [if only on the surface] with power grinder using a wire brush attachment, power planer, and power sander. It is usually cheaper to replace with mold-free lumber than to clean it in view of high labor cost to do so. After doing the above, all timbers, plywood, chipboard, drywall, and other cellulose-based building materials need to be sprayed with two wet sprayings of EPA-registered fungicide [drying in between sprayings], and then two wet sprayings of a wood  mold protectant. Read the special study Mold Home Remedy Recipes to make your own protective spray for wood. You can read the Material Safety Data Sheets for ingredients to ask your doctor about those products and your chemical sensitivity, but usually, after drying, both chemicals are health-wise inert to you. Of course, you should not be present during spraying which requires safety precautions. You very much need to read the following: (1) safe and effective mold remediation steps; and (2) our books Do-It-Best-Yourself Mold Prevention, Inspection, Testing, and Remediation, plus the book Mold Legal Guide. Both books are available at Mold Store 

           Q. We are in the process of designing and building a new home. What precautions should we take to prevent future mold infestation in our home?  [June 3, 2004]
           A. All wood, plywood, chipboard, drywall, and other cellulose-based construction materials must never be stored on the ground during construction, or be left uncovered outdoors [to keep the materials dry if it rains]. Until the house is completely shingled and sided and windows and doors installed, the house-under-construction should be covered completely at the end of every work day to keep the home from being rained on. Beneath your roof shingles should be a high-quality roofing membrane to waterproof your proof. Covering every night is time-consuming, but it is far better than owning a mold-infested home which will harm both your health and your finances. Inspect all timbers and building materials for visual evidence of mold growth [e.g., black or dark blue or green stains on timbers]. Spray all timbers, plywood, chipboard, drywall, etc. on all surfaces with at least two set sprayings of a Mold Home Remedy Recipe, with drying in between the sprayings. Make sure your plumbing water supply, drain, and sewer pipes and plumbing fixtures are of the highest quality and installed by a master plumber, and not by some untrained illegal immigrants [a huge quality control problem in the home building industry]. Be sure your concrete floor slab, garage concrete floor, and basement floors and walls are built with sufficient amounts of waterproofing compound mixed into the concrete to make the concrete absolutely impervious to water penetration. Install a high quality water proof barrier [not just plastic sheeting] beneath concrete floors as an additional water barrier to keep water from rising out of the ground to wet the concrete and therefore the wood walls resting on the concrete floors. When you first have water running in your plumbing system, use a hidden moisture meter to scan all floors, walls, and ceilings for hidden water leaks. Make sure your heating/cooling ducts are made of sheet metal with any insulation being on the outside of the ducts, not inside the ducts. Sheet metal ducts without insulation inside can be cleaned of mold contamination if ever necessary in the future. Make sure all dryer, kitchen, and bathroom vents go by well-connected pipe directly outdoors and not in the attic, crawl space, or walls or ceiling. Install high-capacity ultraviolet lights [388,000 uwats per second of exposure to air movement] in the return air ducts of your heating/cooling system to kill all airborne mold spores and other biological airborne threats.. Install a "mass media", very thick hepa filter in the return air duct to filter out airborne mold spores and other pollutants.


          Q.
I am building a new home and am suppose to move in in three days.  When we went to see it today we saw water on the patio and traced it back to the bathroom.  Something happened to a pipe and we saw results of the bathroom being flooded at some point.  There were two molded boards laying in the bathroom. Also, water stains on the wall and wet under the vinyl on the floor.  It also ran onto the bedroom rug.   What can the builder do about the inside of the wall?  I will have them replace the tile and the carpet but what about the inside of the wall?  Thank you so much for your quick response.  I know all the problems with mold but what can we except the builder to do short of tearing the wall out.  [May 17, 2004]
           A. The first non-invasive step [thru one-half inch entry holes made into each wall cavity] would be to hire a Certified Mold Inspector to use fiber optics to inspect all affected wall cavities for visible mold growth and to do mold air testing inside the walls. If visual interior inspection or mold test results document an internal wall mold infestation, then the wall will have to be opened up in accordance with mold remediation standards explained at http://www.moldinspector.com/mold_removal.htm  In addition, the CMI can use his or her hidden moisture meter to scan all walls, ceilings, and floors for possible hidden water problems. Then the CMI should mold test the air of each room, attic, basement/crawl space, and the outward air flow from each heating/cooling duct register for the possible presence of elevated levels of airborne mold spores, in comparison to an outdoor mold control test which he or she needs to also do. Learn the steps required for safe and effective mold remediation at http://www.moldinspector.com/mold_removal.htm

           Q. I just bought a new home a month ago. When I was going through my final walk through before settlement, the entire unfinished basement was wet. I asked why and the project manager said that they had just power washed the basement as a part of their cleanup process. When they power washed the basement they also soaked the bottom half of the silver backed insulation. Over 30 days later the basement is still damp along every wall from the insulation and we now have visible mold growing behind and on the stairs and also in the rafters. The only thing the builder has done is give us a dehumidifier and a fan to use but that still has not helped. Who can I contact to test what type of mold this is and what can I do? The builder keeps putting us off like this isn't a big deal. I'm now have constant congestion and headaches everyday. Thanks in advance for your help.  [July 17, 2003]
            A.
You must get this big mold problem remediated effectively to your satisfaction if you won't want to harm your family's health and financial well-being [by owning a moldy home that cannot be resold in the future]. All of the mold damaged building materials need to be removed and thrown away. All mold growth on timbers will need to be removed or the timbers replaced. The cleaned out area will need to be sprayed with 2 wet coatings of fungicide and 2 wet coatings of a mold home remedy recipe antifungal coating. Read ALL of the steps required for safe and effective mold remediation at: Mold Removal and Mold Mart.  You need to mold test the following NOW [before mold remediation] and then afterwards: (1) the affected basement walls---use lift tape sampling; (2) the room air of the basement, all rooms of the house above the basement, and the attic for the possibility of elevated levels of airborne mold spores, which, if present, would indicate a serious mold infestation inside your home; and (3} the air flow out of the heating/cooling duct registers for the possibility of elevated levels of mold spores. You should use one of our Certified Mold Inspectors [Certified Mold Inspector, or using do it yourself mold test kits available from a large hardware, home improvement, or safety store.

       Q. I am currently in the process of having a new home built. The house trusses where left uncovered in the mud and rain for well about a month. I started to notice black spots forming on the trusses I had take a swab sample and it did come back positive for many i different molds. I asked the builder to replace the trusses and there answer was no after they put the trusses on the house I had a mold inspector come out and sample he got it the results and the results where high in colony count so the builder had the trusses sprayed I requested for the MSDS for chemical compound however it was a patent formula so they did not have to divulge the chemicals. These where the first results prior spraying:
Aureobasidium   293,000 180     88     
Cladosporium    15,400  180     5      
Penicillium species Var. 1      15,400  180     5      
Trichoderma     7,720   180     2      

Now these are the levels after spraying:

Cladosporium was detected on a non viable swab
Aureobasidium   1,290   180     64     
Monilia sitophila       184     180     9      
Unidentified Colonies  
552     180     27     

      I am still concerned about the growth since when the inspector did a bulk sample you can see the growth under the wood. What be a suggestion on proper remediation since the trusses have been up we have noticed growth on the stud boards. I contacted some home insurance companies and some have refused coverage due to the mold issue, and I have also heard resale of a house with mold can pose a problem due to the requirements of disclosure thus it will bring down property value  [June 27, 2003]

       A. Leaving the trusses out in the mud and rain for so long is a guaranteed way to make the trusses unusable due to mold infestation on and INSIDE the timbers. Mold testing of the surface is not enough---the timbers would have to have no mold growth INSIDE the trusses to be mold-safe---thus mold testing inside the timbers is required.. Spraying visible mold is NOT enough for effective mold problem treatment. Mold needs to be both killed and removed, and then re-sprayed with both EPA-registered fungicide and an EPA-registered antimicrobial protective coating. The visible mold is very likely growing INTO the timbers and will continue to grow and spread unless removed by power planning and wire brush attachment to a grinder. Mold testing needs to be done INSIDE the roof trusses Since this is a new house, you should insist on replacement of the moldy trusses with mold-free, mold chemically-treated new trusses. If you want to avoid health damage to your family and the financial ruin of owning an unsaleable home with a history of a serious mold infestation problem, you need to stand firm in getting new, chemically-protected [EPA-registered antimicrobial coating in 2 wet sprayings each] trusses. If the builder will not voluntarily do this absolutely essential replacement, you need to contact an environmental attorney to help you. You will also need to re-inspect and mold test the entire house after the replacement of the roof trusses because it is very likely that airborne mold spores from the roof trusses have cross-contaminated other areas of your house including any already-installed heating and air conditioning equipment and duct work.  As one additional note, the failure of the builder and the fungicide manufacturer to reveal the contents of the fungicide used on your home is probably a health and safety violation of state and federal environmental laws. Use only EPA-registered fungicides which have adequate product safety disclosures on the products Material Safety Data Sheets {MSDS).

           Q. After moving into our new country style home in August of 2002, we noticed black mold along the bottom of our windows (we have forty windows). The previous owners tried the hide the mold by painting the cocking along the bottom of the windows but when I washed the windows the paint came off and I could see all the mold. After several weeks the bottom of the windows started to show patches of mold. We have a 14 month old baby and a seven and eight year old and we are very concerned about the health risk of the mold. How can we find out if the mold is toxic?    [April 28, 2003]     

           A. To identify the mold species to know how dangerous/toxic it might be, you should collect a physical sample of the window mold growth, or use the Scotch tape lift sampling technique  and to send this sample to a Mold Laboratory for mold analysis and mold identification. You should also use do it yourself mold test kits available from a large hardware, home improvement, or safety store. to sample the air in the various rooms of your home to determine whether any or all of the rooms have elevated levels of airborne mold spores, a sure sign that you have a serious mold infestation problem. You will need to remove all of the materials that have mold growth, treat the cleaned out areas with fungicide and an EPA-registered antimicrobial coating, and then re-grout with new glass grout. You also need to find the water source that drives this window mold growth. One very likely cause is that during part or all of the year, the rooms may have too high a humidity. Buy a digital hygrometer [about $30] in the thermometer section of Lowe's or Home Depot to check the humidity level of each of your rooms, attic, crawl space, and basement on a year-round basis. A humidity level of 30 to 40% discourages mold growth. A humidity level above 60% makes mold growth possible water-wise. The higher the humidity is above 60%, the worse the mold problem.

           Q.
We are in the process of building a new home and during construction the workers had a mishap. When the plumber installed the pipes, he did not close all the valves, thus when a brick worker turned on a faucet to get
water, the master bath upstairs and the kitchen downstairs began to flood. The damage seems to be minimal but I am worried about future problems from this water damage. The builder dried up all the excess water and ran our air exchange system for 2 days. The sheet rock seem in the kitchen ceiling had approximately a 6 foot bulge and the builder said that they only needed to replace the seam. Also about a 4 foot circumference of the newly installed hardwood floor began to mildly warp in the kitchen on the main floor. The builder said that all they need do after it dried was sand out the warped areas and the floor would be fine. Am I being misled by my builder, or could the damage described be repaired so easily. I am spending a lot of money on the house and do not want future problems such as warping in the ceiling or flooring and mold damage down the road. What is your advice? [Feb. 13, 2003]
          
A. You are wise to worry about the possibility of mold growing inside building materials and inside walls and ceilings from that flood. You need to have all of the same, plus the room air the various rooms of your home, inspected and tested by a Certified Mold Inspector. Mold infestation inside your home can destroy the value of your home and harm your family's health in a big way. To read more about the problem of new home mold, please visit: New Home Mold. It would be a good precaution to remove all water damaged building materials, throw them away, and then treat the affected area with two wet sprayings of the fungicide and then two wet sprayings of an EPA-registered antimicrobial coating. Of course, the builder will tell you there is no mold problem because: (1) most builders are not well-informed on mold issues; and (2) the builder does not want to spend much money repairing any water and mold damage caused by the flood.

           Q.
Thanks for being out there!  I visited the site of our lot where our new home is being constructed. The first floor is down and the the basic first floor of the structure is up.  It has been snowing, warming up and the snow has been melting during this time.  I noticed mold on the underside, in the rafters on at least half of the house.  There are still some icicles hanging from the rafters.  On the first floor the wafer board is soaked and the melting snow can be heard dripping down into the basement.  At first I thought that the builder might have something he could spray on this and kill the mold. I then went to Lowe's to ask some questions.  An assistant manager there suggested I have the builder cut the bad pieces out and replace them. I asked him if we could spray the wood with bleach water to kill the mold.  He said you might be able to try that but the mold would probably keep coming back. He said you might be able to spray it with Kilz but he wasn't sure and referred me to the contractors desk for more advice. Those folks aren't in on Sunday so I drove home just about as down in the dumps as I've ever been.  I could not find an inspector for the Clarksville, TN area so I'm wondering if you can help me???  Where do I start, what should I do.  I'll call the builder's office tomorrow and see if he is aware that we've got a serious problem.  I just cringe thinking that we are spending all our savings on this house and it's already making me sick.  We "HAD" lots of plans for the house but I don't know now. I think about the insulation under the house being next to the mold and we were going to put in a drop ceiling but I can't imagine doing that now.  [Feb. 10, 2003]
          
A.
The water damage and the resulting mold growth have to be dealt with by strong measures.  First, you should test the mold with our do-it-yourself mold test kits available at a large hardware, home improvement, or saety store to know what types of molds are already growing in your new home under construction. Second, for professional inspecting and mold testing of your mold problem, hire a Certified Mold Inspector in your area.  Third, you should read the New Home Mold.  Fourth, you need to require that the builder REMOVE all moldy lumber and replace it with mold-free lumber. The advice you received from the Lowe's assistant manager to cut out bad lumber pieces and that bleach isn't a permanent mold kill is correct. His suggestion about Kilz is wrong because Kilz does not kill mold. It hides blemishes in preparation for painting. The home needs to be covered on its roof and exterior walls/windows with plastic sheeting to keep out rain and snow at the end of each construction day. All new building materials need to be inspected for mold problems before use and stored off the ground and under plastic sheeting. After all moldy materials have been replaced, the house timbers, plywood, and all other construction materials need to be inspected by either yourself or a Certified Mold Inspector to make sure no moldy lumber has been used. After such successful examination, all timbers, plywood, chipboard, etc. needs to be sprayed with 2 coatings of fungicide and then with two coatings of an EPA-registered anti-microbial coating.  Read the 25 steps for safe and effective mold removal.

           Q. We had a new home built with a full poured-concrete basement less than 2 years ago. Recently, we discovered several areas in the basement (which has a walk-out wood framed wall on the south side) where water was condensing on the concrete walls. The southwest and northwest corners had the most condensation with moderate amounts of mold growth, which we scrubbed off with bleach water. Less than a week ago, we discovered a more menacing problem beneath the landing at the bottom of the basement stairs. There was a high degree of moisture behind the fiberglass insulation on the OSB board (there is no plastic vapor barrier or drywall here). It was wet (with visible mold growth) as far up the OSB as we could reach. The contractor that built our house may be able to come and more thoroughly assess the problem next week. Your input would be greatly appreciated as would an estimate of the cost charged for inspection and testing of specific mold growth spots. We live in Southeast Indiana. [Feb. 7, 2003]
          
A. Bleach is NOT an effective mold disinfectant. Learn why and what you should really use to kill mold at Mold Killer. Your first step is to document the extent of your mold problem with a very thorough toxic mold inspection and mold testing in all rooms of your home, plus attic, and hvac ducts. Yes, with the serious mold problem you are experiencing, you will have airborne toxic mold spores traveling and landing through out your home and contaminating your entire home, including your home hvac equipment and ducts. Most  Certified Mold Inspectors are also Certified Mold Remediators or Certified Mold Contractors. Thus, you can obtain a detailed bid for getting rid of the mold from your home from our company's mold professional who serves your area. In removing the mold from your home, you need to follow the mold remediation and mold removal advice. Your most important task is to stop the entry of water into your home, whether the water entry is by wall leaks, plumbing leaks, condensation of high humidity, etc. Your Certified Mold Inspector will try to find the water source of your mold problem. The condensation on the walls is probably a direct result of high humidity inside your home. Your inspector will use a digital hygrometer to check and record the humidity percentage of every area of your home. Above 60% humidity is a sure invitation for mold growth. Your targeted humidity level [through the use of programmable dehumidifiers] is 30 to 40%, a low humidity level that discourages mold growth.

          
Q. My mother is allergic to mold, (I think, anyway), because since moving into a basement condo she has been constantly sick.  She also suffers from pain in her hips and joints. While staying in my house her joints stop hurting. This is why I think it could be her condo.  I also was thinking maybe mold was causing her constant sinus infections and sore throats. I have talked her into building a small new house with a basement. I talked her out of a slab foundation for fear of mold problems. So my question.... How can we be sure that the new house will be Ok?  Is there some kind of mold inspection that can be done prior to her moving in? I would hate for her to have to go through anymore problems. She is older with heart problems and just had to have her tonsils out because of all the infections. She is in her 60's! Kind of hard on her to have tonsils out at that age. I am concerned because there is a lot of water that lays on the ground. They assured us that it would be taken care of, but I do not trust builders much anymore after my bad experiences. [Feb. 4, 2003]
          A. You need to work with an architect to protect you in the design and building of the new home. Some of the issues that the architect will worry about is to make sure that: (1) the building site has good drainage AWAY from the home; (2) that the foundations and basement walls are properly waterproofed and that there is a water drainage system installed underground around the foundation and basement walls to carry water away from the basement foundation, walls and floors [e.g., by utilizing such items as pea gravel around drainage pipes in holes to carry water away by gravity or to an outdoor sump pump]; (3) keeping the under construction home covered in plastic sheeting to protect it against rain when the workers go home after every work day; (4) keeping building materials off the ground and covered completely and securing with plastic sheeting; (5) building the home with mold-free building materials instead of commonly use moldy construction materials; (6) installation of an exterior moisture barrier beneath the exterior siding or other exterior skin of the home; (7) installation of a mass media hepa filter into the return duct of the hvac system; (8) installation of powerful ultraviolet lights [to kill mold and other biological contaminants] in the hvac ducts; and (9) overall, to make the home waterproof. If there is no water problem, there is no mold problem. You can also hire one of our Certified Mold Inspectors to be your mold consultant for the design and building of your mother's healthy home, and to watch over the construction in progress to make sure that thre is no built-in water or mold problem.  Please visit: New Home Mold.

           Q.
Back in the spring of 2001.  MY HUSBAND AND I BOUGHT OUR NEW HOME. IN  JANUARY  WE NOTICED OUR KITCHEN FLOOR WAS CHANGING COLORS, IN THE SHADES OF BLACK, PINK, PURPLE AND YELLOW.   WHEN INSPECTING OUR CEILINGS IN OUR BASEMENT WE FOUND LARGE AMOUNTS OF MOLD.  IT WENT THROUGH OUR SUB FLOOR AND THROUGH OUR KITCHEN TILE. WITH IN THE LAST TWO MONTHS BOTH OF MY PETS HAVE BEEN SICK. WE HAVE A PUPPY WHICH GETS BLEEDING FROM HIS NOSE AND MOUTH. AND ALWAYS PANTING. THE OTHER DOGS HAS HAD MANY PROBLEMS WITH HER LEGS, ALWAYS HAVING MAJOR PROBLEMS GETTING UP AFTER LYING DOWN. AS FOR ME I JUST IN THE LAST FEW MONTHS HAVE HAD MAJOR SINUS PROBLEMS, HIVES ON MY SKIN.  CYSTIC INFECTIONS ON MY FACE, DARK CIRCLES UNDER MY EYES. AND JUST LAST MONDAY I HAD A MAJOR BREATHING ATTACK. WHICH ALSO GAVE ME FLU LIKE SYMPTOMS. HIGH FEVER, HEAD ACHES AND CHEST TIGHTENING AS WELL AS SHORTNESS OF BREATH. I JUST THOUGH THAT ALL THIS WAS BROUGHT ON BY STRESS,  NEVER THINKING IT WAS THE MOLD. WE WERE TOLD THAT IF OUR HOUSE HAS MOLD WE CAN'T SELL IT. IS THIS TRUE?????? IS OUR HEALTH AND OUR HEALTH OF ARE PETS A RISK?
WHAT DO WE DO?????????   PLEASE HELP. [July 6, 2002]
          
A. The large amounts of visible mold and the serious health problems which you and your pets are experiencing should suggest to you that your home is possibly not safe to live in until you arrange for your home to have a mold inspection, mold testing, and mold remediation. You and your pets need to find a much healthier place to live NOW until you eliminate your mold infestation problem. Follow the mold inspection suggestions found at Mold Testing. Follow the mold removal tips found at Mold Removal.  Yes, you may find it very difficult to sell a mold infested home for at least 3 reasons: (a) buyers are learning to avoid homes that have environmental problems like mold infestation; (b) you will have to disclose the existence of the mold infestation to all prospective buyers if you don't completely remove the mold contamination and have your property pass a mold clearance test [after mold remediation]; and (c) many smart buyers now put and utilize mold inspection and mold testing provisions into the home purchase contract as one of the conditions of the contract that must be satisfactorily resolved prior to the closing of the home's purchase.

          [June 27, 2002]
           Q.
I am a new home purchaser in the Daytona Beach Florida area. My home is being
built by ____ Company and the home is in the pre-stucco stage. Dry wall has been installed too. It has rained constantly for the last two weeks, and the block is very wet, as well as some of the drywall, due to the lack of stucco that has allowed rain to drip into sections of framing and drywall. There is actually one area that has standing water on the foundation. Do I need to be concerned about mold? It is likely that the insulation is wet too. What should be my next course of action? With the recent news on mold litigation and health problems, I am concerned. [June 27, 2002]
          
A. Your first step is to hire a Certified Mold Inspector to carefully inspect the home and to mold test the construction materials that have been wet for over 24 hours [the time period required for mold to start eating your home]. Find a Certified Mold Inspector.. If you do not pay for your own expert outside testing, you will never know whether your home already has mold growing in it now. Having test results in hand that indicate a serious mold problem will help you motivate the builder to remove water and mold damaged building materials and to chemically treat the affected areas. Please follow the remediation steps at: Mold Removal. If you do not want to live in a mold hell, you must make sure that your home is thoroughly tested, and then thoroughly remediated if mold has started to grow on the drywall, wood timbers, stucco, insulation, etc.

           Q.
I am having a new home built in Springfield, Missouri area. Rainfall was high during initial stages of construction. Home is closed in and roof is on. Subfloors and studs are still exposed. Testing reveals presence of mold. What would you recommend be done at this stage to take care of this new home mold problem?
          
A. Replace all moldy lumber with mold-free lumber and then treat the entire framing and plywood/chipboards/subfloors/underside of roof decking of home with combination of mold fungicide and an EPA-registered antimicrobial coating [separately treatment procedures, of course]. For more info on mold removal, please visit: Mold Removal. [June 21, 2002]

           Q.
I am in the process of buying a new modular home. While delivering my home to the lot, the driver struck a traffic light causing a leak in the roof. The home was not set on the foundation nor sealed for 2-3 weeks. After the home was set, I noticed that my 8 year old daughter's room had suffered serious water damage. (my daughter has asthma and has allergies one of them being mold) The ceiling, wall and carpet were all wet. The Builder replaced the ceiling drywall, trim and painted the wall with Kilz to the kill the green mold. They have told me that the carpet is fine. The carpet has a musty smell and discoloration. I have insisted that the carpet be replaced and would like to have your opinion. [May 19, 2002]
         
A. Have everything [including carpeting and padding, and maybe even the floor beneath the wet carpet area] that was wet removed and replaced with new or you will have permanent mold problems and major health effects. If necessary, hire a lawyer to write a warning letter to both the builder and the modular home manufacturer, and maybe even to the transport company that actually damaged your home. You must replace with new---accept nothing short of that! Kilz does NOT kill mold or anything. It covers up water stained areas as a paint primer to prepare the surface for a new coat of paint. After replacement with new items, have your home mold tested to make sure that is no residual mold infestation. Learn about testing by visiting: Mold Testing.

          Q.
I am in the process of  having a house built, and I have some concerns about possible mold problems in the future.  The house has not been wrapped or sided, and insulation has been put in place.  With the heavy rainfall over the past few days, a good portion of the insulation has been saturated with water.  My husband went to the site and found that the drywallers are hanging drywall right over this wet insulation.  We were told by the builder, that the wet insulation is not a concern as it will eventually dry.  I think that is a ridiculous comment.  Doesn't it make sense to
protect  the home from the elements first and then put the insulation and drywall? [May 2, 2002]
         
A. You should consider stopping construction, and having the insides of the walls and the room air tested for mold infestation by one of a Certified Mold Inspector. To find a Certified Mold Inspector in your area, please visit: Mold Inspector.  If you don't check this problem out now, you may end up living in a mold hell with disastrous health consequences and a loss in value of your home because of built in mold infestation. Visit our web page: New Home Mold.

          Q.
We have a new home we have been trying to correct a leak since we moved in in December - apparently it has been leaking throughout construction. It is leaking through the roof into the attic then down the interior and exterior walls and now under the flooring.   Have questioned the builder about mold, who states since it hasn't been a long time problem that everything will dry and be fine? [April 29, 2002]
          A. Mold spores when wet for just 24 hours will begin to eat and digest your home. In just one week, mold infestation can become overwhelming.  You need to hire a Certified Mold Inspector to thoroughly inspect and mold test the ceilings, walls, floors, hvac equipment and ducts, and the room air of your home to identify elevated levels of mold spores and types of mold present in your home. Visit Certified Mold Inspector .
         

          Q.
PURCHASED A NEW HOME IN ORLANDO, FLORIDA 7 YEARS AGO.  ABOUT TWO YEARS AFTER I MOVED INTO THE HOUSE IN THE RAINY SEASON  I WOULD GET A LITTLE WATER IN MY DINING ROOM TO THE  FRONT OF THE HOUSE  AND I THOUGHT IT WAS COMING THROUGH THE WINDOWS.  EACH YEAR IT GOT A LITTLE WORSE AND   A FEW YEARS AGO I CALLED THE BUILDER AND  SHOWED HIM THE PROBLEM AND  HE SAID IT  WAS A ROOF PROBLEM
AND THEY WEREN'T RESPONSIBLE  FOR IT.   I HAVE A TILE ROOF.  SO I  HAD A NEPHEW  IN CONSTRUCTION WORK AND  I GOT HIM TO FIX THE PROBLEM-ABOUT TWO YEARS AGO. HE SAID WHEN THE TILED THE ROOF THEY DIDN'T  KNOW WHAT THEY WERE DOING AND  HE WORKED ON IT AND GOT THE LEAKING TO STOP.  IN THE COUPLE  YEARS BEFORE THAT IT HAD GOT MY CARPET WET OFF AND ON AND LEAKED DOWN THE  SIDE OF THE WINDOW AND INTO THE GARAGE WHICH IS RIGHT NEXT TO THE DINING ROOM.  SINCE THEN THE  CORNER OF OF THE CEILING IN THE GARAGE HAS TURNED BLACK (I THOUGHT MILDEW- BUT IT COULD BE A BLACK MOLD) AND ALSO IN THE MASTER CLOSET  MY SHOES AND PURSES ARE ALL MOLDING AND ALL MY A. C. VENTS THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE ARE RUSTING.  ALSO THE THE PAST FEW YEARS I HAVE BEEN TO SEVERAL DOCTORS COMPLAINING OF CHRONIC FATIGUE (WHICH I  HAVE BEEN BLAMING ON MY THYROID  PROBLEMS ) WHICH  I AM ON THYROID MEDICINE AND  STILL HAVE  THE FATIGUE. I HAVE DIFFICULTY BREATHING AND COUGH AND SNEEZE A LOT.  DOES THIS SOUND LIKE A MOLD PROBLEM AND IS THE BUILDER ANYWAY RESPONSIBLE?   I AM PLANNING ON HAVING A TEST DONE BUT BEFORE I SPEND THE MONEY I  WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF YOU THINK I MIGHT HAVE  A PROBLEM?  [April 12, 2002]
         
A. With the bad water and mold problems you are facing in this house and your very severe health problems, your first step is to immediately move into a mold-free place until you have thoroughly mold tested your home and completed mold remediation in your home. Mold laboratory analysis of the visible mold and of air samples from your attic, the hvac ducts, and the air inside the rooms of your home will document any mold problems, including the identification and quantification of the types of molds that may have infested your home. Please follow the mold testing tips provided at Mold Testing and Mold Removal.

          Q.
We are in the process of purchasing a newly constructed home that had some mold problems upon the home's final inspection. The rafters in the basement for the main level had mold present. The basement had flooded previously about 3 inches deep due to loss of power to sump pump. The mold was removed and the wood has been treated and passed further tests. We are requesting some sort of additional home warranty for the mold problem. Do you forsee further problems with this situation?  [Feb. 20, 2002]
         
A. Make sure that all of the wood surfaces were treated at least twice with the strongest homemade fungicide Mold Killer---see Mold Killer, and a mold home remedy recipe antifungal coating---see Mold Removal. You should either use do it yourself mold test kits available from a large hardware, home improvement, or safety store---.or hire a Certified Mold Inspector to thoroughly mold test all rooms of your home plus hvac equipment and ducts for elevated levels of mold and for dangerous molds like black mold spores and toxic mold spores. If mold laboratory test results show only normal levels of mold spores and no black mold spores or toxic mold spores, that's great news. You should also obtain a written guarantee from the seller that any mold infestation problems arising in the next 10 years [more or less depending on your negotiating strength] anywhere in your home will be paid for and taken care of by the seller.

         
Q. I am currently having a house built and discovered that on some of the boards in the ceiling have black mold growing on them.  The Builder says this is common for boards coming from the lumber yard and that this is not a mold to be concerned about.  They have said they will spray the mold with bleach water and then spray a sealant over it.  They have not done drywall yet so it is still exposed.  Is this mold something I should be concerned about or is it normal in new constructions? [Feb. 19, 2002]
         
A. No way!  Have all of the mold stained or mold contaminated lumber replaced completely with mold-free lumber. Of course, much lumber mold often comes from the lumber supplier or the lumber mill, but that's no excuse for lumber with mold to be used in YOUR HOME where the mold would be built into your home right in the middle of your walls, ceilings, and floors. Insist on mold-free lumber, and, also, on having all of the timbers sprayed twice with homemade fungicide [to kill any present mold and mold spores] and twice with an home made anti-microbial coating [to kill future mold growth] before insulation and drywall is installed. Read the special study Mold Home Remedy Recipes.

          Q.
I am trying to obtain sources of  information regarding air conditioning metal ductwork versus flex ductwork (the plastic kind that looks like the hose used to vent my dryer).  I currently own a home that has insulated galvanized metal ductwork and am planning to build a new home.  Currently, most of the new homes that I see being built are using an insulated round flex plastic ring ductwork. I am concerned that this type of ductwork will deteriorate over time and could also let bacteria form in its crevices and that I would be better off to stay with insulated metal ductwork. Do you know where I could locate any comparison studies that have been done on these two types of ductwork or sources where I could obtain this type information? [Feb. 13, 2002]
         
A. It is better to build with the traditional sheet metal ducts because they do not have crevices to trap black mold spores, toxic mold spores, and other mold spores. In addition, the absence of crevices in smooth, traditional sheet metal ducts make it hard for mold growth to happen. Moreover, sheet metal gives about a 70% "bounce" increase in the effectiveness of duct-installed ultraviolet lights to kill mold. Killing mold with uv takes substantial uv light energy.

          Q.
I would like know what is the best solution to my mold infestation problem. My problem is that we found mold on our new framing lumber that we just bought to build our new home.   The mold was identified as Aspergillus/Penicillium. We live in Del Rio, TX.  The mold was not noticeable when lumber arrived, and the framing began. Five days into the framing and  a weekend of  very cloudy and high humidity was all it took for the mold to start growing.  Needless to say, we stopped construction.   I would greatly appreciated your help. [Feb. 26, 2002]
         
A. You are to be commended for having the foresight to stop construction until you have removed all mold growth and mold infestation. You need to scrape and power sand all lumber to clean condition [no mold stains or mold growth remaining]. Then spray wet with two coatings of a home made Mold Killer to any remaining mold spores. Then spray wet with two coatings of an home made fungicide to provide an antimicrobial coating on the timbers to prevent future mold growth. For more info read the special study Mold Home Remedy Recipes.

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How To Order Mold and Enviro Products by Phone and Email
PHONE ORDER: You can place your order by phoning mold consultant Phillip Fry Toll-Free 1-866-300-1616
or Phillip's cell phone 1-480-310-7970 USA/Canada, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Saturday.
EMAIL ORDER:  You can also email your order by printing, completing, and emailing the Email Order Form.

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Use high ozone blasting to kill mold, viruses, bacteria, and odors .

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Copyright 2014 Environmental Hygienists Association   All Rights Reserved  Last Updated: Nov. 28, 2014
For mold inspection, mold remediation, and mold prevention for your real estate property anywhere in the world, please contact
mold consultants Phillip Fry and Divine Fry  email phil@moldinspector.com or call Phillip Toll-Free 1-866-300-1616 or cell phone 1-480-310-7970